Project Overview

Originally built in the 1930s, this 75-year-old high school was outdated, undersized, and inflexible for today’s active and personalized learning methods. A major transformation was needed to reboot this historical structure for 21st century learning. Miron assisted various citizen and staff committees working collaboratively to determine how best to transform Menasha High School and better prepare students for future work environments. A community-wide survey showed the majority of district residents supported addressing the needs at MHS.

The final solution involved additions for science and music; expanded technical education areas; remodel of academic spaces for active learning and collaboration areas; transformation of physical education and athletic spaces; improvements to building accessibility, natural day lighting, and parking; building systems upgrades for energy efficiency; and restoration of key historic structures.

Education Market Leader

Craig Uhlenbrauck / Vice President, Education, Education
920.969.7030
craig.uhlenbrauck@miron-construction.com

Owner:

Menasha Joint School District

Size:

48,155 SF Addition | 124,910 SF Remodel

Completion:

September 2015

Architect / Engineer:

Eppstein Uhen Architects

In their words…

“Miron Construction helped to guide and coach us through the development of a facilities vision for our high school. As our community decided on the scope and cost of the project, Miron was there every step of the way offering their services to help us make informed, realistic decisions. Through their strong coaching and advice, our facilities committee came up with exciting, cost-conscious and realistic options for our community, eventually resulting in a 73% yes vote to renovate our high school.”
– Larry Haase, Menasha High School Principal 

“Miron Construction has taken great care to not only ensure the absolute safety of our students and staff, but also to avoid creating disruptions to our school day—all while transforming our building into a 21st century learning environment, and preserving the historical essence of our original 1930s facility.”
– Chris L. VanderHeyden, Superintendent of Schools